And so you code – A fun video to watch

I usually don’t get that carried away by the youtube videos but this one has been done very well. It gets specific to the coders who write computer code and very beautifully stays general to all programming languages and tools. Enjoy the video and don’t forget to turn up the volume 😉

Android – Free course and confirm job for Android Developers in Lahore

Android Training LahoreWe’ve been hearing about the Android software development training course to be held in Lahore in collaboration with P@SHA and PSEB. Things have taken a very interesting twist. The top Android development company Geni Team in Lahore has promised two confirmed jobs and four scholarships of 100% fee waiver for the students joining this course. So four lucky students will get to study it free and two of them have a job offer for sure.

Cant this get more exciting than this? Go ahead and register now.

Training details are available on this link.

To buy or not to buy the new Processor

Processor Comparison – Part 15 of 16

If you are a normal user and dont do alot of number crunching, you may not find a significant difference between these processors in day to day use but if you are a power user and do a lot of DVD ripping, video conversion, extreme 3d gaming, mp3 and video editing, photo conversion, programming or even file compression (zip or rar etc), you will need a faster processor. Go for a top of the line processor if your current machine is out of date but the price of these processor drops faster than the apple falling from a tree. So watch out and dont spend too much on a processor.

I’ve tried to simplify the comparison between these processors in this article but if you think not enough detail has been given, please go through the following table that has been taken from Intel’s website and it compares five different processors, one example from one technology each.

This article is part of a series of articles listed below

  1. Intel Processor Comparison – Introduction
  2. Want a faster PC, get more RAM first
  3. Processor Flashback
  4. Hyper Threading Technology
  5. Difference between Thread and Process
  6. Difference between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
  7. Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3
  8. Difference Between Core 2 Quad and Core i5
  9. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
  10. Difference Between Core i3 and Core i5
  11. Difference Between Core i5 and Core i7
  12. Differences Between Core 2 and Core i Technologies
  13. Difference Between FSB and DMI
  14. Difference Between Smart Cache and L2 Cache
  15. Processor Comparison Bottom Line
  16. Processor Comparison Table

Difference Between Thread and Process

Intel Processor Comparison – Part 5 of 16

Every program that runs on your computer is basically a separate Process. Processes are independent running programs on your computer. They have their independent memory, variables, resources and they participate in competing for using the CPU time. Once you boot your PC, it runs several processes at the same time and once you have only one processor (on a single core computer) you will run only one Process at the same time.

One thread may want to run several parallel tasks at the same time. For example a sofware downloading a file may have one thread receiving data from network, another thread saving the downloaded data on the disk and another thread to display the download status on the screen. Threads use the common memory space and variables defined within a process and can talk to other threads within the same process. You can create threads without spending too much of memory or processing power while processes required significant resources to be spent when creating a new process. Last but not least, threads do not participate in the competition for using the CPU, rather whenever the process containing these threads executes, these threads get a chance to execute.

Threads can easily talk to the parent process and other threads within the same process. Processes can only talk to other processes through an external communication channel named IPC (Inter process communication).

Above description will help understanding the difference between the processors under discussion.

This article is part of a series of articles listed below

  1. Intel Processor Comparison – Introduction
  2. Want a faster PC, get more RAM first
  3. Processor Flashback
  4. Hyper Threading Technology
  5. Difference between Thread and Process
  6. Difference between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
  7. Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3
  8. Difference Between Core 2 Quad and Core i5
  9. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
  10. Difference Between Core i3 and Core i5
  11. Difference Between Core i5 and Core i7
  12. Differences Between Core 2 and Core i Technologies
  13. Difference Between FSB and DMI
  14. Difference Between Smart Cache and L2 Cache
  15. Processor Comparison Bottom Line
  16. Processor Comparison Table

Memory Myth


I’ve been using different memory cards in different devices. I’ve used MMCs, SD, MicroSD, Sony Memory stick and so on. I never bothered re-checking their capacity and trusted on the label on the card itself. I have been using a 2GB MMC-Mobile in my good old N72 and I never went into the phone’s memory monitoring software to see actually how much memory is available on the card. Recenly I got a SanDisk’s 16GB SDHC card and when I plugged it into my Nokia N82, it reports it as 15GB. Thats loss of a whole GB of data capacity. Then I plugged it into my BlackBerry and found that it reports it to be 14.8GB. Another 200MB lost. Then I decided to actually try a few other cards around. I investigated a little further. I plugged my 8GB Micro-SDHC card in my BlackBerry and it reported it to be 7.6 GB. Thats again not 8GB. Then I plugged a common 1GB Micro-SDHC card into my Nokia N82 and it reports it to be 964 MB.

The key point is, I never noticed the capacity loss on 1GB card because its only 60MB. While on a 16GB card its losing a whole 1.2GB.

Why is that happening? I revisitied my basic data capacity and storage unit concepts. Let me list down a few basic facts for you.

1 kilo-byte = 1kB = 1024 bytes
1 megabyte = 1MB = 1024kB = 1024×1024 bytes
1 gigabyte = 1GB = 1024MB = 1024x1024x1024 bytes

Therefore
16GB = 16 x 1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes.

In reality, what memory card manufacturers do, they put it as follows:

1 GB card has slightly more than 1000,000,000 bytes.
It s hould actually be 1073,741,824

Similarly, 16 GB card actually has 16,000,000,000 bytes. This makes the total to 14.90GB

So if you buy 1GB, you should expect actully something less than that.

The thing which is bothering me is, my Nokia reports my 16 GB card as 15GB, while my BlackBerry reports it as 14.8, while it actually is 14.9 GB.

I’m pretty close in above calculation, but where do you think I’m going wrong?